“‘can’t repeat the past?’ he cried incredulously. ‘why of course you can!’”

by Matilda Mills Jr. 6 min read

what is the significance of this quote "“ ‘Can’t repeat that past?’ he cried incredulously. ‘Why of course you can!" This is significant because Gatsby wanted to re-live the past. He wanted to re-shape what has already taken place and somehow will his future with Daisy to happen.

“Can't repeat the past?” he cried incredulously. “Why of course you can!” He looked around him wildly, as if the past were lurking here in the shadow of his house, just out of reach of his hand. “I'm going to fix everything the way it was before,” he said, nodding determinedly.Sep 24, 2014

Full Answer

What does Gatsby mean when he says can't repeat the past Why of course you can?

“Can't repeat the past? Why, of course you can!” Jay Gatsby, the protagonist of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, said this to his friend Nick Carraway in order to convince both himself and Nick that he could recapture Daisy Buchanan, his former love.

Can't repeat the past Gatsby cried incredulously Why of course you can explain how this quote is significant?

This is significant because Gatsby wanted to re-live the past. He wanted to re-shape what had already taken place and somehow will his future with Daisy to happen in the way he always believed it would.

Who said cant repeat the past he cried incredulously?

One of the most important quotes is: “'Can't repeat the past? ' he cried incredulously. 'Why of course you can! '” spoken by Jay Gatsby in regard to his efforts to reclaim his relationship with Daisy.

How does Gatsby respond when Nick says you Cannot repeat the past?

When Nick cautions Gatsby that "You can't repeat the past," Gatsby idealistically answers "Why of course you can!" words that strike Nick soundly because of their "appalling sentimentality," which both delights and disgusts him.

Can't repeat the past he cried incredulously Why of course you can he looked around him wildly as if the past were lurking here in the shadow of his house just?

“Can't repeat the past?” he cried incredulously. “Why of course you can!” He looked around him wildly, as if the past were lurking here in the shadow of his house, just out of reach of his hand. “I'm going to fix everything just the way it was before,” he said, nodding determinedly.

When Nick told Gatsby that you can't repeat the past Gatsby replied Why of course you can quizlet?

When Nick told Gatsby, "You can't repeat the past," Gatsby replied, "Why of course you can!" Do you agree with Nick or Gatsby? I believe that you can do your best to duplicate something from the past, but it will not be exactly as it was before.

What does he mean when he says cant repeat the past Why of course you can 100 ?

In response to Nick Gatsby say's "can't repeat the past? Why of course you can!" This truly highlights his inability to accept the truth, being that Daisy has moved on and is married with a child. It is not only foolish, it is delusional to think that you can turn back time.

What is an important quote from chapter 6 of The Great Gatsby?

'My God, I believe [Gatsby is] coming,' said Tom . . . 'I wonder where in the devil he met Daisy. By God, I may be old-fashioned in my ideas, but women run around too much these days to suit me. They meet all kinds of crazy fish. '

Why did Gatsby change his name quote?

People change their names all the time now for all sorts of reasons: distancing themselves from a family member, traumatic associations with their name, sharing a name with a serial killer... But Gatsby does it for the reason that lots of celebs do it today: to make it sound flashier.

Can't repeat the past he cried incredulously Why of course you can I'm going to fix everything just the way it was before he said nodding determinedly she'll see?

' he cried incredulously. 'Why of course you can! ' He looked around him wildly, as if the past were lurking here in the shadow of his house, just out of reach of his hand. 'I'm going to fix everything just the way it was before,' he said, nodding determinedly.

What is Nick's view of repeating the past?

Nick know that you can't and shouldn't repeat the past, but Gatsby thinks he can just erase the last five years and start over again. His opinion is unrealistic because it's been five years and both of them have changed.

What does Gatsby say to Nick about the past?

What does Gatsby tell Nick about his past? is it true? He says he met Daisy and fell in love with her. He pretended to be able to take care of her, but he couldn't. She loved him, too, at that time.

Why does Gatsby say fix?

The past lurking in the house shows why Gat sby is trying to protect everything that represents the past in his house, such as the old clock. The way he says fix shows that he is dreaming of the past, and thinks that the present is not “right”. This is because it is not like Gatsby’s ideal life, and he thinks that his ideal life is ...

What is the perfect reality in Jay Gatsby?

Fitzgerald has created a character obsessed with the idea of perfect reality in Jay Gatsby; the "perfect reality" being the achievement of the American Dream. Gatsby, who has managed to acquire sought out wealth and new money status through bootlegging is still not satisfied, as he yearns greatly for Daisy whom he believes is the key to the completion of his American Dream. Gatsby's desperation for Daisy and the American Dream is apparent when he stands with his "hands in still his pockets", "reclining against the mantlepiece in a strained counterfeit of perfect ease". The act of putting his hands in his pockets appears very collected and self-assured, as should the move of reclining against a mantelpiece; however Fitzgerald describes Gatsby's action as a "strained counterfeit of perfect ease", the words "strained" and "counterfeit" exposing how Gatsby is faking his cool to try and hide his nervousness. Gatsby's inability to stay calm during his encounter with Daisy represents his build up of anticipation for his ideal reality that he is so desperate to obtain. Gatsby's fixation for the American Dream is exemplified further when he catches the falling clock. The mantelpiece clock, which symbolizes Gatsby and Daisy's time spent together in the past, is "defunct" because they have not met since five years ago, thus time on the clock, as well as Gatsby's image of Daisy, has halted since they last met. Instead of letting the broken clock fall and break, Gatsby catches it, unable to let go of the broken past as he clings on to the no longer existing conception of Daisy, who he desperately needs it to be real for the sake of his American Dream. Despite all of Gatsby's efforts to achieve his American Dream, he is killed before he does, and with this pitiful conclusion Fitzgerald is critiquing not only the falsity of the American Dream, but also the futility of perfection that we humans so eagerly strive for. Gatsby dies chasing for this impossible notion of perfection — of perfect status, perfect family, and a perfect society where all honest effort is rewarded — otherwise known as the American Dream. However the very character who is supposed to represent the virtue of the American Dream is immoral; the very character who is supposed to represent the glamour of the American Dream is never content with his life. With this, Gatsby serves as Fitzgerald's reminder that ideals are not reality, that corruption will always exist, and that perfection is not what we should strive for.

How does the clock in the book of Gatsby represent Daisy?

It is shown in passage one that there is an old clock that had stopped at Gatsby’s house. The clock symbolises Gatsby’s past about Daisy. Nick says that they “all believed for a moment that it had smashed in pieces on the floor” showing that they all thought that the ideal image of Daisy is broken in Gatsby. When he tips the clock, he “caught it with his trembling fingers, and set it back in place.” This shows how Gatsby is wanting to protect his past: the image of an ideal life with Daisy. Passage two supports the idea of Gatsby relying about his past. When Nick says to Gatsby that he “can’t repeat the past,” Gatsby “looked around him wildly, as if the past were lurking here in the shadow of his house, just out of reach of his hand,” and says he is “going to fix everything just the way it was before.” Gatsby strongly denies that the past can not be repeated, as Gatsby is dreaming about his dream of his past, an ideal life with Daisy. The past lurking in the house shows why Gatsby is trying to protect everything that represents the past in his house, such as the old clock. The way he says fix shows that he is dreaming of the past, and thinks that the present is not “right”. This is because it is not like Gatsby’s ideal life, and he thinks that his ideal life is what Daisy will want too. This shows how Gatsby is an egoist, by showing that he is doing everything for his ideal life. This criticizes the idea of the American Dream as Gatsby is illegally making money for his own ideal, while the people in the Valley of Ashes are working hard legally for their family.

Can't repeat the past?

“You can’t repeat the past,” says Nick Carraway to Jay Gatsby. This quote belongs in Chapter 6 of Francis Scott Fitzgerald’s famous novel, “The Great Gatsby.” To which Gatsby replies, “Can’t repeat the past? Why, of course, you can!” This conversation gives a hint about Gatsby’s intention to return Daisy Buchanan, his past love.

Who does Daisy hit in the end of the story?

At the same time, she knows he is cheating with Myrtle Wilson. By the way, there is an unexpected turn of events. At the end of the story, Daisy hits Myrtle, who doesn’t survive in a car accident. The story is told by Nick Carraway, who meets Gatsby upon arriving in New York.

How did Gatsby's notoriety spread?

Gatsby's notoriety, spread about by the hundreds who had accepted his hospitality and so become authorities on his past, had increased all summer until he fell just short of being news.

What did Gatsby say about Daisy?

Gatsby indicated a gorgeous, scarcely human orchid of a woman who sat in state under a white plum tree. Tom and Daisy stared, with that peculiarly unreal feeling that accompanies the recognition of a hitherto ghostly celebrity of the movies. "She's lovely," said Daisy. "The man bending over her is her director.".

Did Mr. Sloane enter the conversation?

Mr. Sloane didn't enter into the conversation but lounged back haughtily in his chair; the woman said nothing either—until unexpectedly, after two highballs, she became cordial. "We'll all come over to your next party, Mr. Gatsby," she suggested.

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