take thou what course thou wilt!

by Mr. Jerrold Willms V 6 min read

William Shakespeare Quotes
Not let it work; mischief, thou art afoot, Take thou what course thou wilt! Julius Caesar, Act 3, Scene 2.

What does mischief thou art afoot Take thou what course thou wilt?

Mischief, thou art afoot. / Take thou what course thou wilt. It is from the Brutus as “an honourable man” speech in Caesar for those who don't recognise it; one of the masterpieces of oratory.Feb 8, 2016

What does Antony mean when he says now let it work mischief thou art afoot Take thou what course though Wilt?

He believes that now the conspirators will be done for and Caesar's soul will rest in peace as his revenge will be taken for sure. He says that now his trick against the conspirators has begun and it can take any path it wants towards destruction. This line shows how clever, witty, cunning and meticulous Antony is.Mar 25, 2017

Who says now let it work mischief thou art afoot?

William Shakespeare
Quote by William Shakespeare: “Now let it work. Mischief, thou art afoot.

Who said I am not Cinna the conspirator?

ACT III SCENE III
ACT III SCENE IIIA street.
Fourth CitizenTear him for his bad verses, tear him for his bad verses.
CINNA THE POETI am not Cinna the conspirator.
Fourth CitizenIt is no matter, his name's Cinna; pluck but his
name out of his heart, and turn him going.
34 more rows

Who said you know not what you do do not consent That Antony speak in his funeral?

Brutus is telling Cassius his plan of explaining to the people why Caesar had to die, then will tell Antony that he must speak on Brutus' permission, and that he shall speak well of Caesar. "... shall not in your funeral speech blame us but speak all good you can devise of Caesar and say you do't by our permission..."

What are the fates of Brutus and Cassius?

At the end of the scene, what are the fates of Brutus and Cassius? They run from the city because the angry mob wants to kill them for killing so great a man as Julius Caesar. It shows that angry mobs will kill anyone indiscriminately.

Who said there is a tide in the affairs?

Brutus
This phrase is borrowed from Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar', where Brutus talks to Cassius saying, “There is a tide in the affairs of men. Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune”.

What is the prose of Shakespeare?

Prose is the form of speech used by common, or comic, people in Shakespearean drama. There is no rhythm or meter in the line. It is everyday language. Shakespeare’s audiences would recognize the speech as their language. When a character in a play speaks in prose, you know that he is a lower class member of society. These are characters such as criminals, servants, and pages. However, some times important characters can speak in prose. The majority of The Merry Wives of Windsor is written in prose because it deals with the middle-class. In Julius Caesar the comical Casca’s story of Caesar’s refusal of the crown is given in prose. Interestingly Brutus’ speech to the people after Caesar’s murder is delivered in prose, but Antony’s is verse, the more sophisticated style. Why did Shakespeare use these different styles? Compare the speeches, and the reactions they generate, and draw your own conclusions.

What language does Shakespeare use?

Shakespeare uses many types of figurative language like metaphor, simile, and personification. Recognizing when his characters are speaking figuratively helps to understand what they are saying. Both Antony and Brutus use a great deal of figurative language as they speak of revenge, justice, and battle.

What is the form of speech used by common people in Shakespearean drama?

Prose is the form of speech used by common, or comic, people in Shakespearean drama. There is no rhythm or meter in the line. It is everyday language. Shakespeare’s audiences would recognize the speech as their language. When a character in a play speaks in prose , you know that he is a lower class member of society.

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